Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Tinytanks for Syria

As many of you are undoubtedly aware, GHQ produces pretty much the highest quality micro armor (and some would say wargames dollies) on the market. Their sculpting techniques and casting quality is second to none and they often seem to produce models in 6mm that make similar offerings in 15 and 20mm pale by comparison. I've picked up a few various kits lately with an intention of making some modern microarmor for Syria, generic enough that they could be in service with any of the factions currently fighting in that hellscape. Here are a few I've completed thus far.

 photo Micro1.jpg

For most of the conflict, T-72AVs have represented the most advanced tanks in Syria. They are mostly assigned to Republican Guard units as far as I can tell, although some elite army formations such as the 4th armoured may also have access to them.

 photo Micro2.jpg
These are actually based on the Indian T-72M1 kit offered by GHQ. Currently there is no rendition of the T-72AV in 6mm. Nevertheless, using the aforementioned kit as a stand in requires only the removable of a couple features to make a passable resemblance. Most importantly these retain the iconic wedge shape layout of ERA on the turret.



T-62s are pretty ubiquitous throughout the conflict. I've always been a big fan of this tank over its smaller brother the T-55. Not really sure why, but I prefer the purely spherical turret and the mid-barrel fume extractor.



As always, I opted with a fairly robust regime of weathering on these guys. The trick was to not over do it and just make them look messy.



BMPs are another common staple of Syria. They seem to be extremely common on both sides and these will easily be usable by ISIS-types.



These particular models are recent resculpts by GHQ and the quality shows. Having dealt with the old GHQ kit, the level of detail permitted by modern casting techniques is extremely evident.

 

Like to AV, BMP-2s seem to be more common amongst elite formations in Syria like the RGs. These are older GHQ kits and you can really tell the quality difference between them and the above pictured BMP-1s.


With these I really wanted to have a nice messed up base, with lots of color, rubble and flock. I achieved this by painting a basic sandy undercoat and then feathered it with lighter tones and applied an oil wash. After this had dried I then applied a raw new level of 'rubble' flock, a mixture of various types of grit and small stone fragments. There was no need to paint this, as it gives a natural feel to the chaos that can't be contrived through conscious painting in my view.


13 comments:

  1. These a fucking amazing!
    That basing my god. Very jelly man, you got mad skills.

    ReplyDelete
  2. These look great! Thank you for the post. What rules do you use for gaming with these modern tanks? I am looking to find some good Modern Rules. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Back when I played I used a modified version of CoC but these days its purely hobby.

      Delete
  3. Amazing brushwork and the basing is second to none!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Awesome brushwork as usual, but I do have one bone to pick with GHQ, it's their cupola MG-type accessories. As gorgeous as the tanks are (and they are incredible) the MGs are often sh*tty little castings which snap at the first opportunity...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, yes, particularly problematic with the old NSVs/DsHKs on the Soviet line. The RWS on the T-90s is much more sturdy.

      Delete
  5. Stunning- I'd be happy with that level of finish on my 20mm toys.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Doug, did you make the basing 'rubble mix' yourself? Very impressive.
    I think you did an excellent job on the weathering. I noted in one YouTube that some BMPs had green road wheels, meaning parts are being supplied from Russian stocks and don't even get repainted.
    Greg C

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yea, the rubble is a mix of various materials - some of which I accrued over several years working as a geological technician back in my slightly younger years!

      Regarding green replacements - I don't think that is necessarily indicative of new Russian stocks. The SAA actually has many vehicles still painted in various shades of Russian green and OD, so its not uncommon for older vehicles to have a 'mix' of schemes on them. If you want direct evidence of new russian gear you need look no further than the shiny new BTR-80s, T-90s, TOS-1As and T-72Bs that are becoming increasingly visible in the Syrian arsenal.

      Also, I'm not Doug :p

      Delete
  7. Very inspirational, especially as I am looking for my next tiny project (3mm)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very inspirational, especially as I am looking for my next tiny project (3mm)

    ReplyDelete